Hydrodiversity

September 5, 2018 § 4 Comments

 

I can’t stop looking at these old maps of the Los Angeles basin, from the late 1880s. Cartographic representation of the way water flowed over, under, and into the landscape approaches the expressiveness of art.

These maps depict a spectrum of conditions between dry and wet that included marshes, seeps, streams, seasonal and perennial wetlands, freshwater sloughs, arroyos, wet meadows, alkali meadows, vernal pools… Each of these hydrological conditions would have supported plants and animals uniquely suited to the resulting ecosystem.

I think of how every place in the basin interacted with water in its own particular way.

And yet these maps are only a snapshot in time. The amount of surface water in the landscape might vary according to the season, and if it was a particularly dry or wet year. In a dry year, a seep might stop flowing. After a string of wet years, it might create a small pond. During a particularly large storm, a river might shift and find a new bed.

In our current urban fabric, much of the land’s hydrodiversity has been reduced to only three basic conditions: Dry (developed) land,  lakes (reservoirs or recreational use), or stream beds (linear channels fixed in place).

What kind of hydrodiversity might urban river and stream restorations seek to create?

For more about the complex mosaic of habitat types that once existed in our basin, please see this study of the San Gabriel River and this one of the Ballona watershed.

Advertisements

The watershed in your yard: the WaterLA 2018 Annual Report

February 23, 2018 § Leave a comment

waterlacover

Books! OK… well – Reports! Part 3, the final of my recommended reads – the practical, the lyrical and

The Celebratory (also, yes, the Nerdy): Water LA 2018 Report

WaterLA , a project spearheaded by the River Project, champions making watershed management local. Hyper local. Your front yard local. The team there combines community outreach with effective, tested permaculture and landscape design techniques to harvest and retain water in yards and street planting strips. Rain gardens, rain barrels, grey water systems and permeable paving are among the solutions used at multiple sites across LA’s Valley. WaterLA organizers locate community members ready to pitch in and engage in work parties, so that everyone’s working together – building community while building resilience.

This year’s WaterLA Annual Report, then, is a celebration of the gains to individuals, families and our water supply delivered through participation in the project. You see, all those small projects add up to groundwater enhancement, and reductions in peak runoff when it rains – dampening the effect of most floods. The Annual Report quantifies water savings and relates project costs to other, more costly, regional approaches currently in use. Native plant and permaculture folks may be excited to see the conversions of lawns to habitat and foodscapes, community-minded folks may find some inspiration in its projects, and fiscally-minded folks may be encouraged to see creative, affordable solutions to expensive regional problems. A worthy project that would benefit all if it could be applied on a larger scale.

Check it out.

Tree: a novel born of a Southern California watershed

February 21, 2018 § 1 Comment

Maker:L,Date:2017-9-16,Ver:5,Lens:Kan03,Act:Kan02,E-Y

Part 2 of books practical, lyrical and celebratory. Today’s offering:

The Lyrical: Tree

Tree’s author, Melina Sempill Watts, dedicated years to enhancing the Malibu Creek and Santa Monica Mountains watersheds through her work as a watershed coordinator at the Resource Conservation District there. She worked with stakeholders to support projects, obtain funding, and educate the public about protecting the treasured mountain resources that so much public money has preserved.

With the debut of her novel, Tree, Sempill Watts shows us just how deeply she treasures those resources as well. While a single California Live Oak tree is the story’s protagonist, the world of the watershed unfolds and adapts, it burns, floods, thrives, and reluctantly submits to asphalt and lawn. It is not only the history of our landscape – including our rivers and streams – but also of our interactions with it, and the hopes and heartbreaks that we imprint onto it. And as our shorter human lives intertwine with Tree’s arching narrative, our aspirations, our births and deaths fall into the rhythm of nature. The story of Tree is a story that includes us. « Read the rest of this entry »

Restoring Neighborhood Streams: a book that LA could use

February 19, 2018 § 7 Comments

Maker:L,Date:2017-9-16,Ver:5,Lens:Kan03,Act:Kan02,E-Y

Creekfreaks! If you, like me, have resolved to pull away a bit from the netflix-amazonprime-hulu bingefests that serve as a daily nonpharma escapist (are we really living these political times?) opiate, and if maybe you, like me, are rediscovering those magical things called books – then I have a few reads for you! They range from  practical, to lyrical, to celebratory. Personally, I find them all inspirational. In today’s post, I give you –

The Practical: Restoring Neighborhood Streams; Planning, Design, and Construction

Restoring Neighborhood Streams; Planning, Design, and Construction (2016, Island Press), builds on author A.L. Riley’s decades of engagement and effort in the restoring and daylighting of streams in urban and suburban areas. This Creekfreak was especially influenced by Riley and her work. Her previous book, Restoring Streams in Cities, is well dog-eared in my library, and has been an important go-to reference for how to think about stream function and restoration design. This new book provides case studies that illuminate fundamental questions that should be the basis for planning and design of urban stream restoration:

  • Is it physically feasible to restore?
  • Is it financially feasible?
  • Does the public support (I’d add: political will) exist to support land use changes to support a live river or stream?

« Read the rest of this entry »

Lists!

June 30, 2017 § 1 Comment

daylighting

There are opportunities to daylight or naturalize culverted or concreted streams throughout the Los Angeles region.

A Creek Freak quickie: 2 LA-centric lists with creek/river connections:

First, stream daylighting got a bump in the LA Weekly this week (#12 of 20 Ways to Fix LA)!

Second, RiverLA has published their 8 Summer Activities on the LA River.  Check it out!

 

In every bottle, a creek…

February 2, 2017 § 4 Comments

arrowhead-bottle-with-springs-list

Next to the snow-covered mountain on each Arrowhead bottle, is a list of “mountain springs” within.

The Arrowhead landmark in the foothills of the San Bernardino Mountains.

The actual Arrowhead landmark in the foothills of the San Bernardino Mountains.

In every bottle of water is a creek, and there is actually a good chance it may be a California creek, as the map in this link indicates: “Lots of your bottled water comes from drought zones.”

This is something I think about every day when I walk by the water dispenser at my office. I look at the snowy mountain top on the label, and mentally compare it to the actual Arrowhead landmark, in the foothills of the San Bernardino Mountains, which I drive by each week. This iconic landmark is made of coastal sage scrub plants: white sage, black sage, california buckwheat, and others (Meek, 2007). Ironically, what makes the arrow stand out from the surrounding chaparral is the grey foliage that advertises the ability of these plants to survive drought.

Our remaining native ecosystems hang on a very delicate balance, and surface water and groundwater play an important role in maintaining this balance. This is just one of the reasons I feel alarmed when I see the list of “mountain springs” listed on the side of Arrowhead bottles. Because I suspect the other places on this list do not look anything like the snow-covered mountain on that label!

img_8525

Steve Loe, a retired San Bernardino National Forest biologist, speaks to a packed house.

Last Sunday, I went to a community hearing sponsored by The League of Women Voters and Save Our Forest Association to learn how Nestlé’s extraction of water from the San Bernardino National Forest impacts Strawberry Creek, its riparian ecosystems, and our local groundwater. Speakers addressed a packed house at the Senior Center in Twin Peaks.

Strawberry Creek is the creek associated with Arrowhead Springs, after which Arrowhead water is named. It is located in the foothills of the San Bernardino Mountains.

Over the last 68 years, Nestlé extracted an average of 62 million gallons per year from wells drilled into the upper watershed of Strawberry Creek. According to figures presented at the hearing, this is over 5% of the safe yield of the entire San Bernardino Basin, which supplies the cities of San Bernardino, Riverside, Redlands, and others. Even in the midst of a multi-year drought, in 2015, Nestlé extracted 36 million gallons.

Nestlé’s extraction of millions of gallons per year occurred even as residents and businesses were required to restrict their own water usage.

For this amount of water, the company paid only $524 each year. One speaker said this came out to $3.65 per acre-foot of water, which the company then sold for 100,000 times that amount.

36  million gallons extracted in 2015, in the midst of a multi-year drought, means that much water did not make it to the creek. This means all of the plants and animals that once lived in the creek are short that much water.

Loe made it clear that the “mountain springs” of Strawberry Creek are not artesian springs which leap out the ground. Rather, they are horizontal wells drilled over 500 feet deep, maximizing groundwater extraction in the creek’s upper watershed, before water even gets to the creek. The drill sites are so dry that no riparian vegetation appears in their vicinity.

Nestlé claims to only extract water that is in ‘excess’ of the Forest Service’s current and foreseeable needs.

Given the outsized importance of riparian habitats in contributing to local biodiversity and providing regional ecological connectivity,  Loe asked, can one say there is excess water when a creek is close to its lowest flows on record? Species that depend on riparian habitat are at low population levels, and others historically associated with the San Bernardino Mountains, have disappeared. Loe believes Nestlé’s extraction of groundwater was a contributing factor in the disappearance of Santa Ana speckled dace, a native fish species, from the area after 2003.

In a statement by the Center for Biological Diversity, the Story of Stuff, and Courage Campaign Institute, Eddie Kurtz wrote, “The U.S. Forest Service has been enabling [Nestlé] to destroy delicate ecosystems in the San Bernardino National Forest for 27 years, and it has to stop. Our government won’t stand up to them, so we’re taking matters into our own hands.”

List of demands, where "FS" means "Forest Service."

A list of demands. Note that “FS” means “Forest Service.”

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION

The co-sponsors of Sunday’s hearing: League of Women Voters of the San Bernardino Area.

I always love the Desert Sun’s coverage of environmental issues: Bottling Water without Scrutiny.

Meek, N. (2007). Origin of the Arrowhead landmark near San Bernardino, CaliforniaCalifornia Geographical Society.

asdf

Found in the San Bernardino Mountains…

Coyote Spring, Inyo County, one of the springs listed on the Arrowhead label.

Coyote Spring, Inyo County, another of the springs listed on the Arrowhead label.

Getting to the Source: Water Quality on the L.A. River

August 11, 2016 § Leave a comment

That L.A. River water isn’t pristine isn’t exactly news. But Heal the Bay’s report this week, with measurements from last summer showing high bacteria content in the river, caused a stir. So what’s going on? We’d like to provide another perspective to better complete the picture and focus the discussion.

With river-connected activities like kayaking, fishing, biking and horseback riding increasing since the EPA’s 2010 determination that the entire L.A. River is to be protected under the Clean Water Act, people have figuratively, and sometimes literally, jumped in. The State Water Resources Control Board and the City of Los Angeles have noted that the river’s water quality was acceptable for activities like kayaking but stopped shy of recommending activities like swimming.

Opening up public access didn’t immediately get us to the point that FoLAR’s Lewis MacAdams had hoped for as a milestone goal for the river: “…a swimmable river.” That’s OK. Since 2010, we’ve taken some large steps forward.

Since 2008 we estimate that we’ve put more than 5,000 Angelenos on the river in our kayaking programs, and there hasn’t been a single reported case that indicated the types of health risks mentioned in the report.

Heal the Bay has made it clear that they do not want to impede the river revitalization process. They emphasized that the report (available here) should not stop anyone from river recreation—only that people should have proper warnings and use common-sense safety procedures.

Unfortunately, following the report there was a great deal of misunderstanding in the general public. Angelenos are accustomed to swimming at Santa Monica Beach or Mother’s Beach in the marina, which regularly get very poor water quality ratings from Heal the Bay due to high bacteria content. The conditions are worse after rain because of urban runoff. We’re all somehow okay with that, as bathers or surfers may get an ear infection or some other ailment, but then surprised when those same problems show up in our hometown river.

We face a systemic water pollution problem in Los Angeles.  « Read the rest of this entry »